Bearing Witness to Fate: Ifa Reading for 2014 by Baba Eli


Jogo de Ikin Orossi

Jogo de Ikin Orossi

Put in simplest terms, Ifa is a religion of the Yoruba peoples of Nigeria West Africa.  Priests of Ifa are called Babalawo. Probably the most important job of the Babalawo is that of translating the teachings of Orunmila for Ifa’s many adherents. Orunmila, who is said to have walked the earth thousands of years ago, is the great prophet of the Yoruba people. He is said to have been the only Orisha to be permitted to witness the whole of creation from beginning to end. He knows the fate and all possible roads of everything in existence. Because of this, he is called “Eleri Ipin” The Witness of Fate. His many teachings, which range from how best to navigate the everyday affairs of the human condition to contemplating highly esoteric ideals, are coded in the 256 Odu of the Ifa religious corpus.

While Odu cannot be easily explained within the confines of one short article, I will for the purposes of this writing, define Odu as the language through which Orunmila speaks to the Babalawo in order to impart his wisdom, knowledge and advice on those who seek it. The precise methodology of this communication is a matter for another time and is best left to those in training for Ifa priesthood.

The tools of the Babalawo – the Diving chain (Opele) and the Ikin – are consecrated to provide a direct connection between The Babalawo and Orunmila. It is with these tools that Ifa divination is performed.  Dafa or Ifa divination is performed for a myriad of reasons. These reasons range from the aforementioned issues of every day human existence to the more in depth knowledge of the individual life experience such as Life path and/or Guardian (crowning) Orisha.

Opele Ifá Orossi

Opele Ifá Orossi

One of the most popular divinations performed by the Babalawo is the Reading of the Year. This is not performed for a single individual, but instead it is for the community at large. Through this reading, Orunmila imparts upon the Babalawo the most prominent energy patterns for the coming year along with knowledge of how to walk in balance with these energies to maximize blessings and prosperity. In Nigeria, his reading is done during their New Year Celebrations in June.  In the United States, we stick with our Gregorian calendar and perform the divination for the New Year on or shortly before December 31st.   My rendition of the Ifa reading for 2014 is as follows:

Ifa Reading for the Year 2014

I     II

II     I

II     I

I     II

 

The Primary Odu for this year is Iwori-Idi.  Each of the 256 Odu of Ifa consists of two “legs”.  The right leg speaks to us of the organization of our daily, temporal life, while the left leg pertains to the organization of our emotional and spiritual life.  The two legs of Odu work in harmony and are interdependent.

Iwori on the right side of the Odu suggests that this year we must steer clear of making snap decisions.  We must go forward with clear heads weighing all options carefully.  Don’t rush into anything.  Make plans.  Look at things from all angles.  My Baba likes to say “Measure twice and cut once”.  You may not get a do-over so make a good impression the first time!

Idi as the left leg of this odu says that we should seek opportunities to express qualities associated with Osun in our emotional and spiritual lives: love, sensuality, movement, adventure, curiosity and abundance.  With Idi it is not only that we need to express these qualities, but also to realize that we DESERVE the happiness and fulfillment associated with these qualities.

All praise to Olodumare that this Odu of Iwori-Idi comes to us Ire (On path/in good fortune) as confirmed by the Odu Otura-Ogbe.

Otura as the right leg of this Odu indicates that maintaining the balance of Ire requires us to approach our temporal/daily affairs with a sense of calm, clarity and focus.  We are instructed to maintain this in order to help us make, clear, concise and informed decisions.  Those based on logic and not the heat of the moment.  Otura also says to take the time to listen to the wants, needs and concerns of others before sharing our own with them.  Others may have insights that you never thought to consider.  This action also serves to show others that you care how they think and feel.

Ogbe as the Left leg says that our emotional and spiritual lives are full to the brim with opportunities this year.  By using calmness, clarity,  focus and empathy we will be able to choose the best paths and opportunities for all concerned.

The area of life governed by this year’s energy is that of relationships as confirmed by Ogbe-Ose.  Ogbe on the right leg of this Odu indicates There is tremendous potential and opportunity for growth in our day to day relationships.  We must remember the lessons of Otura (See above) to help us maintain balance, and the lessons of Iwori (above):  Choose wisely.  Make concise, clear and informed decisions.  Don’t make commitments without thinking long and hard about them.

Ose is the left leg of this Odu.  Ose is another sign of Orisa Osun.  In our spiritual and emotional relationships, Ose is a sign of pure joy, exploration, sexuality, curiosity, all those traits for which Osun is most well-known.  I leave it to each person reading this to interpret what this means to them.

The main Orisha to work with this year to maintain the balance of Ire and maximize the possibilities of this year’s primary Odu, is, of course, Oshun.  Oshun is the spirit of sweet water, of love, of prosperity, of abundance, etc.  Oshun is the Orisha without whom anything about life would be palatable.  She is what makes life worth living.  2014, therefore is a year of love, exploration and prosperity in our relationships. We must, however, remain vigilant.  Do not become careless or complacent.

Aboru Aboye Abosise

Baba Eli

Awotunde Ayodele Ifalere

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Hoodoo and Conjure: Black Cat Dust


Black Cat Dust for Good Luck?

Hoodoo and Conjure magazine seeks to bring information about Southern conjure practices that are little known, interesting traditions. Most folks have heardBlack Cat Bone about the horrible practice of boiling a black cat alive in order to procure that one special bone that will render a person invisible, provide protection against black magic, or bring good luck, especially with regards to gambling. The Black Cat Bone was a most coveted bone by believers, and even today, there is a power and mystique associated with it due to the fact that its procurement involves such a taboo. Animal cruelty is not an acceptable activity, and while it was not considered such by practitioners in the past, it is in no uncertain terms considered cruel today. This taboo, along with the actual ritual itself, is believed to imbue the hoodoo with certain forbidden attributes gained by going through the actual experience of the ritual. But, there are many paths towards a similar destination, and perhaps the newer works created with a newer morality will prove to be just as powerful.

In addition to the special bone used for gambling, there was also the practice of killing a black cat in order to get a left front shoulder bone as an ingredient for a powder which was created to keep the law away. Called Black Cat Dust, this powder was believed to bring good luck in every area of life, from getting a job to making friends and keeping away enemies (Hyatt, 1978).

How is Black Cat Dust Made?

Black Cat Dust consisted of the powdered left front shoulder bone mixed with a ground up lodestone. The combination was then placed inside a bottle of Jockey Club Cologne and worn to attract luck. The technique for grinding both the lodestone and the black cat bone was similar – it involved grinding each back and forth using a window screen. Now, in the past, screens were undoubtedly made of sturdier material than today’s screens. To grind a bone to powder, Madrina Angelique suggests using a box grater. Heating up the bone makes it more brittle and easier to grate. She says it takes a long time to grind bones and that you have to take it real slow (Madrina Angelique, 2013, personal communication).

Read the full article Black Cat Dust in Hoodoo & Conjure: New Orleans

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New Issue! Hoodoo and Conjure: New Orleans


Hoodoo & Conjure: New Orleans

Hoodoo & Conjure: New Orleans

The long awaited follow-up to Hoodoo and Conjure #2 is here! This special edition, Hoodoo and Conjure: New Orleans, reads like a fine wine that only gets better with age –  this issue will not disappoint you!

The timing for this issue could not have been better. With the nation tuning in every week to American Horror Story: Coven to catch a glimpse of Voodoo and witchcraft in New Orleans on TV, we have managed to release Hoodoo and Conjure: New Orleans at the same time. We even have stories in this issue that are touched on in AHS: Coven; albeit, briefly (Mary Oneida Toups, Tituba, Marie Laveaux and Madame LaLaurie) –  all of which were planned over a year in advance of knowing what the show was even going to be about. Serendipity? Syncronicity? Or could it be the Universe telling the world it’s time to take notice of the importance of New Orleans in the grand scheme of super natural things?

In all its gloriousness and fabulous writ, Hoodoo and Conjure: New Orleans brings to you a fantastic collection of articles from a variety of notable as well as up and coming authors. As the title suggests, the majority of the articles center on New Orleans Voodoo, hoodoo, and Old New Orleans Witchcraft; however, we also include some fantastic articles about Appalachian conjure, goetia, international conjure, formulas, recipes, graveyard work, New Orleans style Day of the Dead with Sally Ann Glassman and much more!

Here we go…are you ready?!!!!

Mary Oneida Toups

Mary Oneida Toups

GET THE ORIGINAL STORY OF MARY ONEIDA TOUPS BY THE ORIGINAL AUTHOR, 6th generation New Orleans born Alyne Pustanio! Mary Oneida Toups is recognized to this day as the most powerful witch to have practiced in New Orleans in the 20th century. She was the founder of a powerful coven—The Religious Order of Witchcraft—the first to be recognized by the State of Louisiana as an official Church. According to Pustanio, “Toups’ Religious Order of Witchcraft formed the central axis of a powerful network of practitioners dedicated to the pure, unfettered study and practice of Old Style European witchcraft that still exists in New Orleans today. Many things about Mary Oneida (she preferred just Oneida) are shrouded in mystery, such as her origins. She is said to have been born in Mississippi, in the heart of Delta country, in April 1928 and, like many youths of her generation, when she reached her teens she began to feel restless and took to the road. Hitchhiking, exploring the back roads and byways of the rural South, her path eventually brought her to New Orleans, where she soon became part of a burgeoning bohemian movement already thriving there.

The New Orleans of the early 60s was filled with a current similar to that moving through cities such as San Francisco and New York, a youthful current of exploration and discovery, sometimes aided by drug use that culminated in the Summer of Love and Woodstock moments. In New Orleans, where everything has always been more laissez faire or laid back, the moment crystallized in an “Age of Aquarius” kind of esoteric awakening. Oneida arrived here just as this new awareness was about to bloom” (Pustanio, 2013).

Tituba, Copyright 2013 Jen Mayberry

Tituba, Copyright 2013 Jen Mayberry

READ ALL ABOUT TITUBA, THE BLACK WITCH OF SALEM by the founder of the Dragon Ritual Drummers and the Niagara Voodoo Shrine, Witchdoctor Utu! Utu tells us  ‘As hazy and mysterious a figure as Marie Laveau, many rumours, truths and fiction reflecting from the same mirror, legend and notoriety has been gaining decade after decade, long after her death. Not many people know, but all the hysteria and panic of witchcraft that led to the witch trials, all the hype and horror that has led to a juggernaut of tourism and magik, was because of a Caribbean Voodoo girl, and her name is Tituba ” (Utu, 2013). Utu gives us the back story of Tituba, and then shares with us how the conjurer can develop a relationship with her and work with her spirit.

In addition to these two exciting stories, Hoodoo and Conjure: New Orleans contains the following articles and authors:

  • New Orleans-Style Day of the Dead with Sallie Ann Glassman by Alyne Pustanio
  • In Memorium: Coco Robicheaux by Alyne Pustanio
  • Digging in the Dirt by Dorothy Morrison
  • Food as Medzin by Madrina Angelique
  • The Graveyard Snake and the Ancestors by Dr. Snake
  • Holy Death and the Seven Insights: A Gay Man’s Story of Self-Transformation and
  • his Search for Love by Carolina Dean
  • Adventures in Ghost Hunting by Carolina Dean
  • It Might be a Sign of Things to Come by H. Byron Ballard
  • Wicca and Voodoo: Bringing the Two Together by Nish Perez
  • Wicca and Voodoo: Rhythms by Louis Martinie
  • Crimson Light through Muddy Water: Southern Goth as an Occult Reality by Tim Broussard
  • Mystery Of a Sacred Sastun and The Trinity of Stones: An Interview with Winsom Winsom by Rev.Roots
In Memorium: Coco Robicheaux. Copyright 2013 Alyne Pustanio

In Memorium: Coco Robicheaux. Photograph copyright 2013 Alyne Pustanio

New Orleans Rope Doll

New Orleans Rope Doll. Photograph copyright 2013 Denise Alvarado

We  also have a good portion of the magazine devoted to applied conjure, such as:

  • Spell Work with the Dead by Madrina Angelique
  • How to Bury an Enemy by Madrina Angelique
  • Uncrossing Land by Aaron Leitch
  • Dem Bones by Danette Wilson
  • Conjure with the Goetia by Devi Spring
  • The Wishing Tomb of Marie Laveaux by Denise Alvarado

We also have formulas and recipes, as well as an illustrated tutorial How to Make a New Orleans-style Rope Doll. And that’s not all!

Whether you are a loyal reader or finding us for the first time, I am sure this collector’s issue will find a home on your coffee table or nightstand for years to come. So, relax, grab some coffee or tea, have a few snacks handy and get yourself a copy of Hoodoo and Conjure: New Orleans and witness all its fabulous glory. Much love and care went into its creation, and I hope that you find it every bit as satisfying to read as it was for me to create it.

Read more  and purchase a copy at http://www.creolemoon.com/books.htm#TLMBqQs5psQa9O8W.99

Hoodoo and Conjure: New Orleans. Artwork copyright 2013 Denise Alvarado

Hoodoo and Conjure: New Orleans. Artwork copyright 2013 Denise Alvarado

What’s Inside Hoodoo and Conjure Issue #2


If you were wondering what is inside Hoodoo and Conjure Quarterly Issue #2, this blog will answer that question. It is over 50 pages longer than the premiere issue and chock full of good and interesting information. I hope you have a minute or two because we have a lot to cover including our new contributors and some fabulous new artwork to go with their incredible articles.

REGULAR FEATURES

For those of you interested in the Native American influence on Hoodoo and conjure, I have written an article Indian Spirit Hoodoo that discusses some of the various Native American herbs and curios that can be found in New Orleans Hoodoo.

Indian Spirit Hoodoo

Indian Spirit Hoodoo by Denise Alvarado

Appalachian Hoodoo practitioner Byron Ballard, also known as Asheville’s Village Witch, reminds us of the benefits of DIY Hoodoo in her article Homegrown and Homemade: How to Grow a Botannica in Your Backyard.

Homegrown and Homemade

Homegrown and Homemade by H. Byron Ballard

A fascinating look into the journey of Doc Miller and his legendary Hoodoo Drugstore is presented in Issue #2. Who knew that it would be a mess of cobwebs that would make a believer out of Doc Miller?

Doc Miller’s 21st Century Hoodoo Drugstore

Doc Miller’s 21st Century Hoodoo Drugstore by Denise Alvarado

CHARMS AND FORMULARY

Of course we have a nice selection of charms and formularies for those applied folk magic practitioners out there. The illustrious Dorothy Morrison brings us her Sex Magic Formulary with artwork by our new artist Inga Kimberly Brown.

Sex Magic Formulary

Sex Magic Formulary by Dorothy Morrison

For our readers interested in GLBTQ issues in the ATRs, Chiron Armand brings us his article The Lavender Passage. Armand is a magickal practitioner for almost a decade, he is an initiate in the Unnamed Path shamanic tradition.

The Lavender Passage

The Lavender Passage by Chiron Armand

NEW FEATURES

We have a new column brought to you by Koz Mraz called Myth, Magick, and Motorcycle and he takes us along his journey to Joshua Tree. You may be interested in knowing that it is Koz’s band Studio Voodoo that provides the music for our video trailer.

Myth, Magic and Motorcycle

CONJURE ARTIST PROFILE

Contributed by Alyne Pustanio is our featured conjure artist profile on The Slow Poisoner (alias Andrew Goldfarb). According to Pustanio, Andrew Goldfarb “is a one man surrealistic-rock-and-roll- band from San Francisco. He strums a guitar shaped like a dying swan and sings about swamp women, weeping willows, furtive rituals, cosmic paranoia, creeping fungi, forgotten diseases and witches in the woods. He keeps time by thumping on a kick drum rigged with sleigh bells, and while performing displays elaborately painted signs that bear the title of each song being sung…” (Pustanio, 2011, p. 109).

The Slow Poisoner

The Slow Poisoner by Alyne Pustanio

INTERNATIONAL CONJURE

And as the infomercials say “But wait, that’s not all!” We also have a couple of new contributors that offer their experiences with conjure from an international perspective. Witchdoctor Utu gives us a unique glimpse into working with Mama Moses (Harriet Tubman) and the ancestral spirits of the underground railroad in Canada. Utu discusses the historical background of Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad and shares with the reader how to build a cairn to honor Mama Moses and the ancestors. He is the founder of the Dragon Ritual Drummers, the Niagara Voodoo Shrine, and is a member and drummer for the New Orleans Voodoo Spiritual Temple.

Mama Moses and the Conjure Tradition of the Underground Railroad by Witchdoctor Utu

And then we are proud to have African-born Winsom Winsom from Belize, a very wise woman I am honored to call my friend and soul sister. Yes, that is her real name and it means “Covering of the Ocean.” She shares with us her experiences with the death rites of Belize. Winsom holds multiple initiations including initiation into the West African fetish healing tradition and initiation in Matanzas, Cuba as a Priestess into Santeria. Winsom studied and worked with healers such as Sobonfu Some, and Malidome Patrice Some and has taken part in Rituals in New Orleans Priestess Miriam and others. According to Winsom, “I continue to bring about the synchronization of my art and spirituality and believe “true power originates internal spiritual enlightenment, and that we must use this power to reach our higher selves: creating harmony”. Yeah, now that’s what I’m talking about!

Cry a Bucket of Tears for My Daughter by Winsom Winsom

Continuing with our international contributors, we have with us Doktor Snake, legendary bluesman, cult author, and Voodoo conjurer from England. He shares with us the story of how his Hoodoo mentor Earl Marlowe first taught him How to Your Soul to the Devil at the Crossroads. Doktor Snake also wrote the kick-ass forward for my new book the Voodoo Hoodoo Spellbook.

How to Sell Your Soul to the Devil at the Crossroads

How to Sell Your Soul to the Devil at the Crossroads by Doktor Snake

FOLKLORE

No magazine about Hoodoo, conjure and the indigenous traditions would be true to the cause without the inclusion of folklore. Oral tradition is the cornerstone of indigenous knowledge. It is the means by which our ancestors pass on their wisdom and ways of life so that we may benefit and carry them to generations to come (Alvarado, 2011). Following this train of thought, we have included not only the article by Doktor Snake, How to Sell Your Soul to the Devil at the Crossroads, we also bring to you How Br’er Rabbit Lost his Foot or The Rabbit in Magic and Folklore by Matthew Venus and the Plate Eye by Carolina Dean.

How Br'er Rabbit Lost His Foot or The Rabbit in Magic and Folklore

How Br’er Rabbit Lost His Foot or The Rabbit in Magic and Folklore by Matthew Venus

Of course, our resident New Orleans folklorist  and my homegirl Alyne Pustanio  presents a fabulous article on The Gree Gree Men: Voodoo Doctors of New Orleans as only she can tell it.

The Gree Gree Men of New Orleans

The Gree Gree Men of New Orleans by Alyne Pustanio

TUTORIALS

We have gotten some very good feedback about the tutorials we offered in the first issue and so we have continued to meet the needs of our readers by providing some very unique tutorials in this issue, as well. For example, Aaron Leitch, author of Secrets of the Magickal Grimoires, and The Angelical Language: Vols.I and II brings us an Offering Ritual for Archangel Iophiel  where he not only tells how to petition this angel for assistance but also provides a tutorial for making Jupiter Cakes.

Offering Ritual for Iophiel

Among my personal contributions to this issue of Hoodoo and Conjure Quarterly is the very New Orleans Voodoo tradition of How to Make Red Brick Dust that follows my Curio Spotlight on Red Brick Dust.

How to Make Red Brick Dust

I also provide a tutorial for making Ant bed Conjure Dolls to go with my article on Mississppi Death Conjure or Killing Hurts. Don’t let the title scare you off –  this is a class of works that goes way back in the Hoodoo tradition before Hoodoo even arrived on these shores. There are also a couple of video tutorials that go along with the article and tutorial that can be found on our YouTube channel hoodooconjurejournal.

Part 1 of Mississippi Death Conjure is based on a class of hoodoo spells referred to as “death conjure” or “killing hurts”. Part 1 illustrates the creation of two conjure doll babies and their preparation for the ant bed spell.

Part 2 of Mississippi Death Conjure documents the “Ant Bed Spell”, based on a class of hoodoo spells referred to as “death conjure” or “killing hurts”. Part 1 illustrated the creation of two conjure doll babies and their preparation for the ant bed spell.

Now, its no secret that I am a lover of doll conjure, having authored two books that focus exclusively on that subject, Voodoo Dolls in Magick and Ritual and The Voodoo Doll Spellbook. Another of our contributors is also a well-versed doll conjurer in his own right, Carolina Dean. Between the two of us, you can be sure to find something on doll conjure in every issue of Hoodoo and Conjure Quarterly. Dean gives us a slightly more palatable tutorial than mine in his article Spirit Dolls. He tells how to prepare the doll, how to call a spirit into the doll and how to work with it for any practical magical purpose.

Spirit Dolls

Spirit Dolls by Carolina Dean

Then we have for you another type of fetish tutorial brought to you by Madrina Angelique. This is How to Make a Business Elegba specifically for the layperson. For those who may need a little help with their businesses and finances, try making one of these powerful fetishes and see what happens.

Making Elegba

Making Elegba by Madrina Angelique

ARTWORK

Finally, if you thought the artwork was off the hook in the premier issue, wait til you see this issue! The screenshots I have posted for this blog gives you a good idea of what to expect but there is so much more I am NOT showing and that you will only find in the magazine itself. I have created some powerful pieces to complement our contributor’s articles, and Karen Miranda Augustine has provided us with her take on Pomba Gira while Ricky Pustanio gives us his interpretation of the gree gree men. We also have two new artists, Inga Kimberly Brown and the Slow poisoner, aka Andrew Goldfarb. And we cannot forget the fantastic photography provided for us by Matthew Venus. I’m telling y’all, you won’t want to miss this issue!

There is much more to this issue than I have presented here, but this will give those of you who have yet to see the magazine a good preview of what you will find within its pages. No go forth and get your own copy of Hoodoo and Conjure Quarterly #2, the magazine that looks, feels, and reads like a book!

Find it on Amazon.com.

Your Tarot-Scope Winter 2011


Everyone knows what a horoscope is, most of you probably read your own horoscope every day, if not occasionally. A tarot-scope is different from a horoscope in that a horoscope is determined based on the position of the Sun, Moon, and planets in relation to one another for each of the 12 signs of the zodiac; whereas a tarot-scope is based on a random throw of a set of tarot-cards, called a reading, for each of the 12 signs of the zodiac.

Now gifted-reader Carolina Dean throws the cards in order to reveal, instruct, and prophesize YOUR winter tarot-scope exclusively for readers of Hoodoo and Conjure Quarterly.

Aries (March 21 – April 20)

Get your gris-gris on as the nights grow colder,  the days longer and romantic relationships have the potential to become more intimate. Marriage or a similar commitment could soon be in the cards.  If you are single, be careful not to become so involved in your job duties that you miss out on a possible love-connection at your place of work or business. Wear a violet leaf in your shoe to lead you to new love.

Taurus (April 21 – May 20)

Steady-work brings added stress on the job. Your experience and attention to detail will enable you to successfully meet deadlines in record time, however, be wary of a newcomer with something to prove. A female associate with good judgment becomes a powerful ally. Light a candle to Martha the Dominator.

Gemini (May 21 – June 20)

With the bitter cold setting in, there is a natural desire to stay warm at home. However, the opportunity to break through personal obstacles and open the way for greater spiritual growth presents itself when you join a cause or charity helping the less fortunate. Make a sacrifice of your time and energy and reap the rewards of the spirit of renewal. Rise before dawn and bathe is silence.

Cancer (June 21 – July 22)

With a new year around the corner, now is a great time to cut and clear un-healthy ties and form healthy ones, especially in the area of love, romance and friendship. There is a natural tendency to resolve to change outmoded behaviors. However, the cards suggest setting a few small realistic goals rather than several large ones in order for your works to be crowned with success. Build an altar to your own success.

Leo (July 23 – August 22)

Now is a great time to reconcile your gains and losses in the previous year and give yourself a pat on the back for all you have achieved. Begin your plans for greater success in the new year. A business partnership with a trusted friend could be in the offing. Lay your burden down, at the crossroads.

Virgo (August 23 – September 22)

Romance blooms when a proactive love-interest won’t take no for an answer. Step out of your comfort zone, shy Virgo, and see how the other half lives. A shake-up in the power-structure at work brings drastic changes—- but relax, your job is secure. Light a candle for those less fortunate.

Libra (September 23 – October 22)

A fresh coat of paint and new furniture is just what the doctor ordered as a financial windfall allows you to give your home a much needed facelift.  A letter brings unexpected news and major transformations shatter preconceived notions.  Ward your home with sage and salt.

Scorpio (October 23 – November 21)

Frustration sets in as you find you have more projects than you can shake a stick at and you aren’t getting anything done. Goals which seemed in sight before now seem out of reach. Don’t wear yourself to a frazzle— prioritize your projects in terms of short and long-term goals. Carry high john for strength.

Sagittarius (November 22 – December 21)

Adventurous Sagittarius longs to travel, but responsibilities keep you close to home. Keep cabin-fever at bay by visiting friends or taking your romantic partner for a day trip in your down time. Carry comfrey root to avert disaster.

Capricorn (December 22 – January 19)

This is a year that you would rather forget. Despite your hardships, however, you learned many valuable lessons which have afforded you new wisdom and a strength which you did not know you possessed. Now is a time for celebration before you face your next challenge. Bathe in hyssop to cast off evil.

Aquarius (January 20 – February 19)

Your outer strength belies your inner doubts and fears, despite which you are able to forge ahead with plans and achieve goals in a relatively short amount of time. With the past behind you, a new beginning and a fresh start is now possible on all fronts. To walk over evil, fear not…..

Pisces (February 20 – March 20)

There’s nothing wrong with celebrating your successes, but don’t forget about the ones who helped you get to where you are today. A mentor imparts a powerful lesson that causes you to reevaluate your present path. You can’t keep doing the same thing and expect a different result. Pay homage to the ancestors.

Carolina Dean is a Witch, a Rootworker, Magickal Craftsman, and Gifted-Reader born in the deep south. He is the Assistant Editor and a regular contributor to Hoodoo and Conjure Quarterly. Visit www.carolinaconjure.com for more information.